Category Archives: LeRoy Neiman Art Center

Harlem Welcomes the Art of Chief Nike Okundaye

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Arts Horizons LeRoy Neiman Art Center and Harlem Needle Arts, are pleased to present the works of Chief Nike Okundaye: An Odyssey Through the Years
May 5 – June 17, 2017
Opening Reception: Friday, May 5, 6-8 pm

This solo exhibit showcases works by Chief Nike Okundaye, her transformation of indigenous Yoruba Adire textile symbols into works in acrylic, pen and ink on canvas. An Odyssey Through the Years amplifies one woman’s overarching goal to emancipate herself while giving a voice to the voiceless as she empowers families through their Nigerian roots.

The artist will be present for the opening reception.

Location: 2785 Frederick Douglass Blvd. @ 148th Street, New York, NY 10039
Gallery hours: Tuesday-Thursday 10am-8pm | Wednesday 12pm-6pm | Friday by Appointment Only Saturday 10am-4pm

Press Inquiries Contact:
Marline A. Martin | 212-862-2787 | Email: marline@neimancenter.org | Website: http://neimancenter.org/
Michelle Bishop | 212-491-8581 | Email: michelle@harlemneedlearts.org | Website: https://harlemneedlearts.org/

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VALERIE MAYNARD: Artist in Print in exhibit at the Arts Horizons LeRoy Neiman Art Center

A major exhibition, VALERIE MAYNARD: Artist in Print, in celebration of Women’s History Month in on display at The LeRoy Neiman Art Center in collaboration with The Romare Bearden Foundation. This valuable and timely exhibition highlights the art of Valerie Maynard, a prominent contemporary African American artist, whose portfolio of prints has been placed in the collection of the United States Library of Congress.

Exhibition dates are March 10-April 15, 2017; Opening Reception – Friday, March 17, 6:8:30pm; and Artist Talk – Saturday, April 8, 4-6 @ Arts Horizons LeRoy Neiman Art Center, 2785 Frederick Douglass Blvd., Harlem, NY.

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Valerie Maynard, “Senufo,” 1987, Artist Proof, Serigraph, 30″ x 22″, on BFK Rives paper

A sculptor, painter, printmaker, designer and educator, Valerie Maynard was the first Artist in Residence in the Studio Museum of Harlem and is recognized as a distinguished artist of both the Black Arts Movement of the sixties as well as a contemporary artist today. Maynard has worked as a professional artist and as a conscious and contributing member of the creative community for over 60 years.

Her work is featured in private collections around the globe including the private art collections of Stevie Wonder, Lena Horne and Nobel laureate, Toni Morrison. In 1977 Maynard was part of a contingent of hundreds of African-American artists who represented the North American Zone exhibiting in FESTAC’ 77, the Second World Black and African Festival of Arts and Culture in Lagos, Nigeria. Maynard embraces all aspects of the art world, working as a fine artist, an educator, a curator, and a set designer. She has exhibited her artwork all over the United States and abroad.

Throughout her career, Maynard has received many awards including residencies in Pennsylvania, New Hampshire, and New York, The Studio Museum in Harlem where she was a part of a group exhibition Labor, Love, Live Collection in Context, held November 14, 2007 – March 9, 2008, as well as a New York Foundation for the Arts Grant in Printmaking. As an Artists’ Book Resident, she produced Lost and Found, a portfolio of ten black and white silkscreen prints that forms part of the artist’s ?No Apartheid? series expressing the terror and injustice of apartheid. Her accomplishments are unparalleled in her ability to create art on a board scale. Her technical abilities supersede what would be expected of most artists.

The literature on Valerie Maynard is scanty. Despite her creative and technical skills, there are few publications on her. “Valerie is one of our unsung women artists, who very little has been written about, ” explained Johanne Bryant-Reid, Co-Director/Co-Curator, Romare Bearden Foundation. “This exhibition gives us an opportunity to bring the spirit of her art to community and to remind us of the struggle, survival and salvation.”

Maynard embraces all aspects of the art world, working as a fine artist, an educator, a curator, and a set designer. She is a versatile, multi-media artist expressing herself through a variety of mediums including wood, glass, stone, paint, collage, printmaking, and set design. Because she uses art as a language, the medium she chooses to work with at any point in time depends largely on what her message is going to be.

This exhibition, Artist in Print, focuses exclusively on a variety of Maynard’s prints providing an entry on Maynard and her visual interpretation of the African and African American experience. There are approximately twenty-five (25) prints and two pen and ink works in the exhibition representing over three decades of a blend of expression, gesture and spirituality elements recurring in the African and African American cultural and artistic practices. A portfolio of ten black and white silkscreen prints were produced as part of the artist’s “No Apartheid” series. This work was done in 1989 with the Women’s Studio Workshop in Rosendale, New York. Using found materials and photographs as a starting point, these beautiful prints express the terror and outrage of apartheid. The suite of ten prints featured an introduction by Toni Morrison. The Lost and Found portfolio is in the collection of the Smithsonian Museum.

The apparition of images assembled in this exhibition draws upon the sculptural presence of African art and engages the viewer in what looks like an apocalyptic drama of protest, passion and pride. These compositions are full of striking binaries that also reflect a conscious harmony. The black and white forms and spaces complement one another while exploring the interplay of light and shadows offering spectral images of faces, bodies and communities. By and large, Maynard’s visual metaphor relates art to life and carries along a narrative and a sense of history that proclaims her identity as an artist.

“We are pleased to host this exhibition at The Center in collaboration with the Romare Bearden Foundation,” stated Marline A. Martin, Executive Director/Curator, LeRoy Neiman Art Center. “Printmaking was one of Mr. Neiman’s primary art forms, he was a champion of serigraphy, lithography and etching; and in the case of Romare Bearden, his serious work in printmaking included over one hundred editions in etching, lithography and screen print.”

Born in Harlem in 1937, Valerie Maynard apprenticed as a portrait painter with Elaine Jourmet before studying painting, drawing and printmaking at the Museum of Modern Art and the New School for Social Research in New York City. She received an M.A. in Sculpture from Goddard College in 1977 and has worked with wood, clay, fabric, stone and a variety of other materials over the past 50 years. She is represented in many important collections including the Brooklyn Museum, National African-American Museum, National Museum of Mozambique, National Museum of Nigeria and the Studio Museum in Harlem.

The Harlem-born and raised printmaker and sculptor has left a lasting mark on her hometown with one most notable piece – a permanent installation at the 125th Street Subway Station in Harlem. 

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Valerie Maynard in conversation with Chalres Daniel Dawson at the Arts Horizons LeRoy Neiman Art Center

 

Oringaly published on March 16, 2017 by Marline Martin, Executive Director of the LeRoy Neiman Art Center

Spotlight: Chris Lin @ PS 46X

Born and raised in Taiwan, Chris Lin is a Queens­-based visual artist with over 25 years of teaching experience. He has worked with students of all age groups, newly immigrated Chinese ELL students, and senior citizens. Since 2010, he has been an instructor at the Leroy Neiman Art Center (LNAC). Last month, Chris concluded a series of highly successful Saturday morning visual arts workshops as part of an ESL program for parents and families of elementary school students enrolled at PS 46 in the Bronx. This program was possible through NYCDOE’s “Arts and Family Engagement” grant.

This semester, Arts Horizons is pleased to offer the students of PS 46 a wide variety of arts education programs from AH teaching artists Navida Stein (storytelling), Larry Washington (percussion), Suzi Myers (world dance), Silvana Marquina (dance), and Andy Algire (recorder).  We are especially grateful for Principal Jennifer Ade-Alexander, Assistant Principal Roxanna Bello-Sullivan, Assistant Principal Mary Champagne, and all of the faculty for their continued support over the years.  We are also eager to continue providing an average of 215 students with music, dance, and theater programming with an average of 10 contact hours per student.

AH Program Coordinator, Kiran Rajagopalan, visited one of Chris’s Saturday morning workshops at PS 46 earlier in February. Let’s take a quick peek!

Chris Lin assisting his younger participants at PS 46

The primary focus of Chris’s residency was on sculptural traditions from around the world. Over five Saturdays, participants created vejigante masks from Puerto Rico, pottery with Mexican motifs, sculptural pop-up books, and animal sculptures commemorating Chinese New Year. The range of materials that participants worked with included:  clay, colored cardstock, glitter, and tempera paints. Chris began each session with a brief 10-minute lecture in English on an artistic discipline and introduced specific vocabulary words. Cindy Cabral (ESL teacher) and Karen Ramirez (site coordinator and librarian) then translated his lecture and instructions into Spanish to ensure that communication to all participants was clear. The residency concluded with a formal exhibition of the artwork displayed in PS 46’s state-of-the-art library and an informal reception for the participants and their invited guests.

Parents busy at work painting their pottery at PS 46.  

Feedback from both Karen and the participants has been extremely positive for Chris’s residency. Karen commented that he received “rave reviews” from parents and students, and his workshop “is the best they’ve ever had.”  She also revealed that participation started off very small during the first session, but enrollment quickly grew to more than 20 regular participants due to positive word-of-mouth.  One parent even went home in the middle of one session to pick up her child to participate in the workshop!  Both Chris and Karen are eager to do another family workshop at PS 46, and hopefully this time they can enroll more fathers!

Arts Horizons 2017 Program Guide

The Arts Horizons 2017 Program Guide is available for schools and communities to browse our diverse array of arts-in-education opportunities.

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Contact our experienced staff to find out more information and book your program.

1-888-522-ARTS (2787) info@artshorizons.org 

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Start your creative engagement with Arts Horizons today! View or download our 2017 Interactive Program Guide.

 

Port Authority Bus Terminal Project Headlined on NYC Dept. of Education Home Page

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On July 10, 2013, Arts Horizons’ Port Authority Bus Terminal Art on the Horizons mural was featured on the New York City Department of Education website Home Page.  It will be shown several times during the next month.  The mural was unveiled on June 19 by Paul King, Executive Director of Arts and Special Projects for the Department of Education, who said that the website feature is “a wonderful tribute to this project.”

Read an excerpt of the “In Our Schools Today” article below:

Port Authority Commuters Treated
to Student Art

Fourth and fifth grade students from PS 94 in the Bronx pointed in excitement when they saw Art on the Horizons, a huge, color-saturated collage measuring 18’ x 6’, hanging in the entrance of the Port Authority Bus Terminal in Manhattan. They created the piece in partnership with students from the Mount Vernon Elementary School in Newark, NJ and the Arts Horizons LeRoy Neiman Art Center in Harlem.

Click here to read the full story

BlackBall On Exhibit Now At The Arts Horizons LeRoy Neiman Art Center

BLACKBALL: Illuminating Negro Leagues Baseball opens on August 27, extending through September 27th, at the LeRoy Neiman Art Center in Harlem. Organized by the Arts Horizons LeRoy Neiman Art Center in partnership with the Harlem Historical Society and the Harlem Black Yankees, and sponsored by Abyssinian Development Corporation, the exhibition includes paintings, fiber art, sculpture, giclée prints and digital renderings created by a selection of emerging and established artists dedicated to sports, storytelling and history.

Participating artists are from New York, New Jersey, Detroit and California and include Donald “Sunn” Anderson, Lou Grant, Charles Hearn, Rod Ivey, LeRoy Neiman, Kadir Nelson, George Preston, Sherry Shine and Grace Y. Williams. Local artisans have also been specially commissioned to create NLB-inspired collectibles, which will be presented at the reception and remain on display for the duration of the exhibit.

Reception: Thursday, September 13, 2012 from 5:30-8:30pm at the LeRoy Neiman Art Center, 2785 Frederick Douglass Blvd. (near 148th Street).

Other special events include free family NLB films and workshops on Saturdays, September 8, 15 and 22. Please contact the Neiman Art Center for more details.

 The LeRoy Neiman Art Center 
2785 Frederick Douglass Boulevard near 148th Street
 neimancenter@artshorizons.org or call us at 212.862.ARTS

Remembering LeRoy Neiman

World renowned artist, LeRoy Neiman, was best known for his brilliantly colored, stunningly energetic images of sporting events and leisure activities. We knew him for his generosity, his passion for sharing the arts with the next generation, and for his commitment to supporting service in the arts within urban communities across America. It has been through Mr. Neiman’s extraordinary vision and on-going support that Arts Horizons was able to open the LeRoy Neiman Art Center in Harlem, providing children, schools, service organizations and the community-at-large with free and affordable visual arts programming and exhibition opportunities. Words cannot express our gratitude and affection towards him for making the LeRoy Neiman Art Center a reality and for continuing to nurture it so it could become a wonderful place where beautiful art is created within the Harlem Community. Mr. Neiman was not only a generous man, but a warm and caring spirit who brought his passion for creating art to everyone who knew him. We are deeply saddened by this loss, but honored to continue his legacy through the creative, cross-generational work we are doing here at the Neiman Center. Please join us in remembering and celebrating his life, everyday!

Marline Martin
Director, Arts Horizons LeRoy Neiman Art Center

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