VALERIE MAYNARD: Artist in Print in exhibit at the Arts Horizons LeRoy Neiman Art Center

A major exhibition, VALERIE MAYNARD: Artist in Print, in celebration of Women’s History Month in on display at The LeRoy Neiman Art Center in collaboration with The Romare Bearden Foundation. This valuable and timely exhibition highlights the art of Valerie Maynard, a prominent contemporary African American artist, whose portfolio of prints has been placed in the collection of the United States Library of Congress.

Exhibition dates are March 10-April 15, 2017; Opening Reception – Friday, March 17, 6:8:30pm; and Artist Talk – Saturday, April 8, 4-6 @ Arts Horizons LeRoy Neiman Art Center, 2785 Frederick Douglass Blvd., Harlem, NY.

AAEAAQAAAAAAAAuFAAAAJDRiZjAwNjJiLTVkYmEtNDc1OC1hOWVjLWUxNzQ4MGI4ODc1Yw

Valerie Maynard, “Senufo,” 1987, Artist Proof, Serigraph, 30″ x 22″, on BFK Rives paper

A sculptor, painter, printmaker, designer and educator, Valerie Maynard was the first Artist in Residence in the Studio Museum of Harlem and is recognized as a distinguished artist of both the Black Arts Movement of the sixties as well as a contemporary artist today. Maynard has worked as a professional artist and as a conscious and contributing member of the creative community for over 60 years.

Her work is featured in private collections around the globe including the private art collections of Stevie Wonder, Lena Horne and Nobel laureate, Toni Morrison. In 1977 Maynard was part of a contingent of hundreds of African-American artists who represented the North American Zone exhibiting in FESTAC’ 77, the Second World Black and African Festival of Arts and Culture in Lagos, Nigeria. Maynard embraces all aspects of the art world, working as a fine artist, an educator, a curator, and a set designer. She has exhibited her artwork all over the United States and abroad.

Throughout her career, Maynard has received many awards including residencies in Pennsylvania, New Hampshire, and New York, The Studio Museum in Harlem where she was a part of a group exhibition Labor, Love, Live Collection in Context, held November 14, 2007 – March 9, 2008, as well as a New York Foundation for the Arts Grant in Printmaking. As an Artists’ Book Resident, she produced Lost and Found, a portfolio of ten black and white silkscreen prints that forms part of the artist’s ?No Apartheid? series expressing the terror and injustice of apartheid. Her accomplishments are unparalleled in her ability to create art on a board scale. Her technical abilities supersede what would be expected of most artists.

The literature on Valerie Maynard is scanty. Despite her creative and technical skills, there are few publications on her. “Valerie is one of our unsung women artists, who very little has been written about, ” explained Johanne Bryant-Reid, Co-Director/Co-Curator, Romare Bearden Foundation. “This exhibition gives us an opportunity to bring the spirit of her art to community and to remind us of the struggle, survival and salvation.”

Maynard embraces all aspects of the art world, working as a fine artist, an educator, a curator, and a set designer. She is a versatile, multi-media artist expressing herself through a variety of mediums including wood, glass, stone, paint, collage, printmaking, and set design. Because she uses art as a language, the medium she chooses to work with at any point in time depends largely on what her message is going to be.

This exhibition, Artist in Print, focuses exclusively on a variety of Maynard’s prints providing an entry on Maynard and her visual interpretation of the African and African American experience. There are approximately twenty-five (25) prints and two pen and ink works in the exhibition representing over three decades of a blend of expression, gesture and spirituality elements recurring in the African and African American cultural and artistic practices. A portfolio of ten black and white silkscreen prints were produced as part of the artist’s “No Apartheid” series. This work was done in 1989 with the Women’s Studio Workshop in Rosendale, New York. Using found materials and photographs as a starting point, these beautiful prints express the terror and outrage of apartheid. The suite of ten prints featured an introduction by Toni Morrison. The Lost and Found portfolio is in the collection of the Smithsonian Museum.

The apparition of images assembled in this exhibition draws upon the sculptural presence of African art and engages the viewer in what looks like an apocalyptic drama of protest, passion and pride. These compositions are full of striking binaries that also reflect a conscious harmony. The black and white forms and spaces complement one another while exploring the interplay of light and shadows offering spectral images of faces, bodies and communities. By and large, Maynard’s visual metaphor relates art to life and carries along a narrative and a sense of history that proclaims her identity as an artist.

“We are pleased to host this exhibition at The Center in collaboration with the Romare Bearden Foundation,” stated Marline A. Martin, Executive Director/Curator, LeRoy Neiman Art Center. “Printmaking was one of Mr. Neiman’s primary art forms, he was a champion of serigraphy, lithography and etching; and in the case of Romare Bearden, his serious work in printmaking included over one hundred editions in etching, lithography and screen print.”

Born in Harlem in 1937, Valerie Maynard apprenticed as a portrait painter with Elaine Jourmet before studying painting, drawing and printmaking at the Museum of Modern Art and the New School for Social Research in New York City. She received an M.A. in Sculpture from Goddard College in 1977 and has worked with wood, clay, fabric, stone and a variety of other materials over the past 50 years. She is represented in many important collections including the Brooklyn Museum, National African-American Museum, National Museum of Mozambique, National Museum of Nigeria and the Studio Museum in Harlem.

The Harlem-born and raised printmaker and sculptor has left a lasting mark on her hometown with one most notable piece – a permanent installation at the 125th Street Subway Station in Harlem. 

17917384_10154557482267896_43107148653191436_o

Valerie Maynard in conversation with Chalres Daniel Dawson at the Arts Horizons LeRoy Neiman Art Center

 

Oringaly published on March 16, 2017 by Marline Martin, Executive Director of the LeRoy Neiman Art Center

Rally to Save the Arts on the steps of NYC City Hall!!

Although the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) has faced threats of closure and survived major cuts to its funding in the past, this new administration’s current proposition could make its total demise a harsh reality.  The proposed Fiscal Year 2018 budget calls for the complete elimination of the NEA along with the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH), Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS), Corporation for National and Community Services (Americorps) and other federal agencies.  It even threatens to retroactively cut monies awarded to these agencies during this Fiscal Year!

Pictures6

In response to such ominous developments, the NYC arts community gathered in large numbers at City Hall on Monday, April 3 for the Rally to Save the Arts.  This rally, organized by NYC City Council Speaker Melissa Mark-Viverito and Majority Leader Jimmy Van Bramer, was the platform through which Arts Horizons and other organizers, peers, allies and arts advocates galvanized the steps of City Hall and fervently demanded the full restoration of federal funding for the arts, culture, and humanities. Our organization had to be part of this rally as we believe that the arts are integral to the life cycle of individuals, schools, communities, ideas, humanity and collective progress.

 

List of News Media from the April 3rd Rally to Save the Arts at NYC City Hall

 

 

For more information, contact Dena Malarek, Director of NYC Residencies and Special Populations at dena@artshorizons.org

2017-04-03_12-33-26_102

New Addition to the AH Team: Charlissa Jackson

Arts Horizons is pleased to welcome Charlissa Jackson to our team as the Program Assistant for the NYC Residencies and Special Populations Department.

Charlissa is an accomplished administrative professional with over 14 years of experience in non-profit and corporate sectors. Earlier in her career, Charlissa worked as a company manager on several Broadway and off-Broadway theatre productions. Additionally, she has held responsibility as both a teaching artist and a marketing assistant for a community based arts-in-education organization, and as a legal secretary at a multinational law firm. Charlissa is delighted to join Arts Horizons as a program coordinator, wherein she provides support for the NYC Residencies & Special Populations department, managing databases and artist contracts.

In addition to her professional experience, Charlissa volunteers for several nonprofit agencies throughout Bergen County and was honored in May 2016 at the State House in Trenton with the New Beginnings Award. She is also is a proud wife and mother of two.

Spotlight: Chris Lin @ PS 46X

Born and raised in Taiwan, Chris Lin is a Queens­-based visual artist with over 25 years of teaching experience. He has worked with students of all age groups, newly immigrated Chinese ELL students, and senior citizens. Since 2010, he has been an instructor at the Leroy Neiman Art Center (LNAC). Last month, Chris concluded a series of highly successful Saturday morning visual arts workshops as part of an ESL program for parents and families of elementary school students enrolled at PS 46 in the Bronx. This program was possible through NYCDOE’s “Arts and Family Engagement” grant.

This semester, Arts Horizons is pleased to offer the students of PS 46 a wide variety of arts education programs from AH teaching artists Navida Stein (storytelling), Larry Washington (percussion), Suzi Myers (world dance), Silvana Marquina (dance), and Andy Algire (recorder).  We are especially grateful for Principal Jennifer Ade-Alexander, Assistant Principal Roxanna Bello-Sullivan, Assistant Principal Mary Champagne, and all of the faculty for their continued support over the years.  We are also eager to continue providing an average of 215 students with music, dance, and theater programming with an average of 10 contact hours per student.

AH Program Coordinator, Kiran Rajagopalan, visited one of Chris’s Saturday morning workshops at PS 46 earlier in February. Let’s take a quick peek!

Chris Lin assisting his younger participants at PS 46

The primary focus of Chris’s residency was on sculptural traditions from around the world. Over five Saturdays, participants created vejigante masks from Puerto Rico, pottery with Mexican motifs, sculptural pop-up books, and animal sculptures commemorating Chinese New Year. The range of materials that participants worked with included:  clay, colored cardstock, glitter, and tempera paints. Chris began each session with a brief 10-minute lecture in English on an artistic discipline and introduced specific vocabulary words. Cindy Cabral (ESL teacher) and Karen Ramirez (site coordinator and librarian) then translated his lecture and instructions into Spanish to ensure that communication to all participants was clear. The residency concluded with a formal exhibition of the artwork displayed in PS 46’s state-of-the-art library and an informal reception for the participants and their invited guests.

Parents busy at work painting their pottery at PS 46.  

Feedback from both Karen and the participants has been extremely positive for Chris’s residency. Karen commented that he received “rave reviews” from parents and students, and his workshop “is the best they’ve ever had.”  She also revealed that participation started off very small during the first session, but enrollment quickly grew to more than 20 regular participants due to positive word-of-mouth.  One parent even went home in the middle of one session to pick up her child to participate in the workshop!  Both Chris and Karen are eager to do another family workshop at PS 46, and hopefully this time they can enroll more fathers!

Arts Horizons 2017 Program Guide

The Arts Horizons 2017 Program Guide is available for schools and communities to browse our diverse array of arts-in-education opportunities.

fullscreen-capture-332017-10811-pm-bmp

Contact our experienced staff to find out more information and book your program.

1-888-522-ARTS (2787) info@artshorizons.org 

fullscreen-capture-332017-10822-pm-bmp


Start your creative engagement with Arts Horizons today! View or download our 2017 Interactive Program Guide.

 

Arts Horizons Welcomes The Redhawks Native American Dance Troupe

Arts Horizons Welcomes The Redhawks Native American Dance Troupe to our Live Assembly Peformance Roster.  The Redhawk’s program combines traditions from various nations, helping audiences understand the vast differences between Native American Nations. By combining live singing and drumming with traditional dances, social dances, and articulate verbal interpretation, they are able to create high energy, exciting programs.  The Redhawk’s dance troupe members are not just performers but Native American artists and educators, who have spent their lives learning cultural traditions and history from family members and tribal elders.

yashti-flute

Yashi plays his flute for the student audience

The Redhawk Dance Troupe focuses on three important factors: to educate; to entertain; and to break stereotypes.  By sharing the origin and history of the dances, as well as the meaning of their traditional regalia, they provide the audience with authentic interpretations. The dance troupe has fashioned breathtaking performances that will make one’s heart soar while experiencing an explosion of color and sound.

 
Traditional dances and stories are combined with a contemporary style of presenting that continues to capture audiences around the world. The programs include different forms of audience participation, allowing participants to share Native American Indian cultural traditions.

 
To book an assembly program with the Redhawks Native American Dance Troupe contact:

 

Gloria Page
gloria@artshorizons.org  1-888-522-ARTS(2787) x 120

1936211_109035441990_597577_n

Spotlight: Vickie Fremont in Fordham University @ PS 85X

Noted fashion designer, anthropologist, and recycled materials artist Ms. Veronique “Vickie” Fremont has been an AH teaching artist for over eight years.  Fluent in five languages (French, Spanish, English, Portuguese, and Italian), Vickie is a highly effective arts educators for English Language Learners (ELLs).  She has just finished an AH in-school visual arts residency at PS 85 in partnership with Fordham University’s Graduate School of Education in the Fordham Heights neighborhood of the Bronx.  Ms. Joyce Griffen, another AH teaching artist who has been working with us since 2009, is also currently working with PS 85 students in a storytelling program.  Joyce is an accomplished actress, jazz vocalist and director with extensive experience in special education.

Arts Horizons is pleased to enter our second year at PS 85 in partnership with the Fordham Center for Educational Partnerships initiative with Community Schools.  This continues a longstanding relationship working with the students and educators at PS 85 that dates back to 2007.

AH’s new program coordinator, Kiran Rajagopalan, visited one of Vickie’s classes earlier in January at PS 85.  Let’s visit one of her classes

accordion-book-and-storyAn “Accordion Book” by one of Vickie’s students

Vickie’s AH residency was aimed at PS 85’s ELL students primarily in grades 3 and 4.  She focused on bookmaking so that students had ample opportunities to practice writing in English.  In the picture above, Vickie is holding some examples of “The Book of Diversity” created by her students using recycled materials such as cloth scraps, beads, and yarn.  Students were also instructed to draw a self-portrait and write on where they come from and how they are learning English inside the books.  This was just one of several books the students made during the residency!  Other projects included:  “The Book of the Favorite Words,” “Book Accordion,” and “Mobile Book.”

Vickie also used her proficiency in Spanish to great effect, and she conducted her classes in both English and Spanish so that communication was clear for each and every student.  Mr. Carlos Torres, a teacher at PS 85, was very appreciative of having an visual arts program for students because it “really makes a difference with academic[s]” as it “engages their creativity and relaxes their minds to learn.”  Vickie added that her residencies are designed to encourage students to “discover the connection between the hand and creativity.”

img_7047-editedStudents at work in PS 85X with Vickie (left) and Carlos (right)

%d bloggers like this: