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Storytelling, Music and Art at the New York Public Library

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We are excited to share an update on the expansion of the Arts Horizons LeRoy Neiman Center.  For nearly a decade, our physical space of the Arts Horizons LeRoy Neiman Art Center in Harlem engaged the community in vibrant and innovative art classes and exhibits.  After the recent closure of the physical site, we are remain committed to keep the concept of the center, and famed artist Mr. Neiman, alive through our work via the ‘LNAC Without Walls’ to continue offering quality programs which celebrate the rich history of the Harlem community.

Our revered Family Art Programs will continue with a storytelling series featuring Miss Navida who will bring her talents to three New York Public Library branches.  Children and their caregivers can take part in these programs at the Macombs Bridge Library, Countee Cullen Library, and Hamilton Grange Library.   These programs are supported through the NYC Department of Cultural Affairs.   Miss Navida is a specialist in storytelling, music and is a multifaceted actor, musician, educator, and playwright.  Please see the schedule of programs below and contact the library directly for registration details.

 


Macomb’s Bridge Library
2650 Adam Clayton Powell Jr. Blvd.library logNew York, NY, 10039
(212) 281-4900

Presenter: Navida Stein

Wednesday April 11th , 10:30am
STORYTELLING & ART – It’s Raining, It’s Pouring! It’s Spring! Making Umbrellas
Flower Power UmbrellaChildren will create their own mini-umbrellas using a paper plate, glue, tissue paper & a popsicle stick. We will sing some rain songs & take a walk in the rain with our umbrellas. Everyone will help to tell the story of Mushrooms in the Rain.

 

Friday May 11th , 10:30am
STORYTELLING & ART – Creating Turtle Puppets & Telling Turtle Stories
Children will create their own Turtle Puppets using a paper plate, glue, construction paper, a popsicle stick and crayons. We will learn the chanting/fingerplay poem There Was A Little Turtle and then use our turtles to tell the fun interactive story The Talkative Tortoise aka Why the Turtle’s Shell is Cracked or Eric Carle’s book The Foolish Tortoise. Everyone will take home their turtles and a copy of the poem.


Countee Cullen Library
104 West 136th Streetlibrary log
New York, NY, 10030
(212) 491-2070

Presenter: Navida Stein

Thursday May 3rd, 11:00am
STORYTELLING & ART – It’s Raining, It’s Pouring! It’s Spring! Making Umbrellas
Children will create their own mini-umbrellas using a paper plate, glue, tissue paper & a popsicle stick. We will sing some rain songs & take a walk in the rain with our umbrellas. Everyone will help to tell the story of Mushrooms in the Rain.

Thursday May 31st, 11:00am
STORYTELLING & ART – Creating Turtle Puppets & Telling Turtle Stories

turtle twins spuyten duyvil

Children will create their own Turtle Puppets using a paper plate, glue, construction paper, a popsicle stick and crayons. We will learn the chanting/fingerplay poem There Was A Little Turtle and then use our turtles to tell the fun interactive story The Talkative Tortoise aka Why the Turtle’s Shell is Cracked or Eric Carle’s book The Foolish Tortoise. Everyone will take home their turtles and a copy of the poem.


Hamilton Grange Library
503 West 145th Streetlibrary log
New York, NY, 10031
(212) 926-2147

Presenter:  Navida Stein

Friday May 4th, 10:30am
STORYTELLING & ART – Creating Crocodile Puppets

Striped Crocodile at Soundview BXChildren will create their own Crocodile Arm Puppets using crayons, glue & construction paper. We will learn the Miss Navida song When I Take a Walk with my Crocodile & take our newly made crocodiles for a walk. We will end with everyone helping to tell the story Crocodile Beat. Limited to a maximum of 20 participants.

 

 

Saturday May 12th, 10:30am
STORYTELLING & ART – Fish Mobiles
Children will create their own Fish Mobiles using colored pencils, heavy paper, glue, string & googly eyes. We will sing the song 5 Little Fishies, the Miss Navida song 1 Fish, 2 Fish & take our fish for a swim. For inspiration we will read the book Fish Eyes ending in a group storytelling experience of The 3 Little Fish & the Big Bad Shark. Limited to a maximum of 20 participants.

IMG_0309

 

 


For more information, please contact Dena Malarek, Director of NYC Residencies and Special Populations at dena @ artshorizons.org  212-7219*108
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Student-created African Tribal Masks at 2011 Annual Gala

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Featured on the tables as centerpieces at our 2011 Annual Gala were African-inspired masks.  The unique masks not only added something special to the event space but they were a great opportunity to showcase student work.

The masks were inspired by a variety of  authentic African tribal masks such as San, Yohure, Senufo, Baule and Ligbi.  Under the direction of teaching artist Donovan Nelson, the students and staff at the LeRoy Neiman Arts Center in turn created their own masks using the different patterns, styles and colors.

The masks became a conversation piece around the room and souvenirs for the guest at the end of the night.  We even have two in our NJ office, reminding us of the successful event and the beautiful work created. The centerpieces the students completed was a big hit this year, so we are all excited to see what our young artist come up with next.

LeRoy Neiman is Wall Street Journal’s “Donor of the Day”

By MELANIE WEST

Famed artist LeRoy Neiman drew his first prize-winning picture more than 80 years ago. As a child, he says, drawing was a passive classroom activity, and not something teachers or parents paid much attention.

“There was no glory,” says Mr. Neiman, now 90. “Nobody cared if you were a genius.”

But Mr. Neiman is determined to inspire genius in a generation of new artists. A few years ago, Mr. Neiman gave $1 million to Arts Horizons, a nonprofit arts education organization, to establish the LeRoy Neiman Art Center in central Harlem. He supports the organization annually and recently gave $150,000 to the organization to further the programming and provide scholarships to students at the center.

Arts Horizons, which is based in Englewood, N.J., primarily works to bring art, music, dance and theater to schools in the tristate area. The organization also has programs for senior and community centers and hospitals, ranging from African dance groups to songwriting to quilting.

The center in Harlem, at Frederick Douglass Boulevard near 148th Street, offers low-cost classes, taught by professionals, to all ages. About 600 people take classes annually.

“People of any age really have the chance to be transformed by the art and when they walk in the door they can leave the pressures of school and life behind and immerse themselves in the creative art that they’re doing,” says Elizabeth Halverstam, executive director of Arts Horizons. “We feel that’s a legacy that can stay with them the rest of their lives.”

During his career, Mr. Neiman often taught art classes and says that all young artists need to be amused in a classroom to maintain interest. A good artist can be often be identified by his sense of mischief and humor, says Mr. Neiman. Bravado is an important element, too. “Showing off is a big thing,” he says.

Inside Mr. Neiman’s art studio in the Hotel des Artistes on the Upper West Side, the walls are filled with a lifetime of artwork. A painting of Frank Sinatra leaning against the bar at Rao’s Restaurant features prominently. There is a painting of jazz greats that fills a wall and a drawing of a dancer in Vegas. His colorful images have appeared in galleries, hundreds of magazine and newspapers articles and in his book. His paintings of athletes and sporting events are well known.

Mr. Neiman recalls that when he was a young artist he knew he was talented, but what separated him from his competition was a drive to be successful. He sees that in some of the students who attend the Harlem center.

“I was a kid from the streets and being from the streets you knew a lot of things the other kids didn’t know. Mostly mischief,” he says. “So these elements you put to work in your art and your subject matter is rich.”

—melanie.west@wsj.com

For Melanie West’s article in the Wall Street Journal:
Renowned Artist Seeks to Inspire New Generation

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